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GS Ngehndzen

In December 14th 2015 Muutos For kids partnered with Word Alive Ministry International to donated exercise books, pencils, calculators and pens to teachers, children who have been in school but have no books and pencils.

The team arrived GS Ngehndzen at 9;30am and were received in the office of the head teacher where the team explained their reason for visiting the school. The team was made up of the senior pastor of Word Alive Ministry International  Apostle Wirsiy Keith Lishishar, Assistant pastor Wirnkar Evans, Pastor Timothy and Wirsiy John Bongkiyii CEO of Muutos For Kids.

The explanation of the visit was done by the senior pastor of word alive ministry international after which the head teacher of GS Ngehndzen appreciated them for coming and explained how happy he was to have them visit for a very important cause as this. The head teacher then called the teachers of all the classes to provide him with a list of children that had no exercise books, pens, pencils and those who were performing well so that they can be gathered for the team to encourage them and share the things they brought to them.

The teachers did as demanded by the head teacher; gathered the pupils and the team encouraged them and shared the school needs they brought for them according to their needs.

After this above session, the CEO of Muutos For Kids addressed all the pupils of GS Ngehndzen in a speech filled with inspiration and encouragement for the pupils to study hard, share with others, be of good obedience and respect for their parents.

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IPS IPNS Mbveh report

On the 4th of March 2016 Muutos For kids paid a visit to IPS/IPNS Mbveh which was aimed at encouraging schools to set up libraries and taking to teachers about the importance and need to treat children with love. The team from Muutos lead by Wirsiy John bongkiyii had a session with the head teacher of the school for over 30 minutes on treating children with care the center of this session was the fact that children turn to understand more when they are taught by the ones they love more that those they are scared of or those they detested. The head teacher confirmed this was true as he gave testimonies of some teachers whose classes were always very funky and the pupils retain a lot from their classes and had good grades in their tests.

At the end of the session the head teacher said he was going to pass the message to all the teachers and make sure that they implement it for better child development and performance of the school and to pass the message further to the parents as they come for their parent teacher association meetings.

After the treating children with love session was a brief talk on the importance of reading and seting up school libraries which ended up by the team together with the head teacher and other teachers moved to the Nursery and primary section of the school to share the books to the kids so as to arose the desire to read in them as the nice pictures in the books will first attract them. After the sharing of the books the team had some pictures with the student and teachers holding their books.

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Muutos visited CS Mbveh

On the 5th of June 2016 a team from Muutos visited CS/CNS Mbveh to talk about the importance of quality education which is goal number 4 of the SDGs to the Head teacher and how it was important that at local levels steps should be taken towards the attainment of that goal. The main reason of the teams’ visit was to encourage schools to set up libraries that will be containing a variety of books to benefit over 300 pupils for that year and expecting to benefit over 1200 pupils in 4years.

On the 10th of June 2016 the team returned back to CS/CNS Mbveh to implement the “encouraging schools to setup libraries” project.

The team arrived CS/CNS Mbveh at 9:30, were welcomed by the head teacher in his office where there had a small discussion with him about how Muutos own contribution to setting up of their libraries, the benefit of the library to the teachers and children, how the school can maintain the libraries and how they can encourage the children to sign books and read. At 10:00am, the team the children were all assembled on their assembly ground and the teacher introduced the team from Muutos which later addressed the children on their visit to their school. The team made it clear to the children that what makes people successful in life is the information they get most of it is gotten from the books they read. The team also encouraged the kids to use the books and that they should always ask their teacher questions from what they read ask for help in difficult words and meanings.

The kids were very eager at this point to see the books and to satisfy then and boast their anxiety to read the books the team told the them that they were going to share the books to them so they can see for themselves how nice the books were after which they were shred the books to later collect and the kids were very excited to see the book. After this exercise the team visited the Nursery section of the school, hand almost the same chat with the teachers and shared the books to the kids which made them so happy that they never wanted to give back the books as the images and stories in the books interest them.

On the 5th of June 2016 a team from Muutos visited CS/CNS Mbveh to talk about the importance of quality education which is goal number 4 of the SDGs to the Head teacher and how it was important that at local levels steps should be taken towards the attainment of that goal. The main reason of the teams’ visit was to encourage schools to set up libraries that will be containing a variety of books to benefit over 300 pupils for that year and expecting to benefit over 1200 pupils in 4years.

On the 10th of June 2016 the team returned back to CS/CNS Mbveh to implement the “encouraging schools to setup libraries” project.

The team arrived CS/CNS Mbveh at 9:30, were welcomed by the head teacher in his office where there had a small discussion with him about how Muutos own contribution to setting up of their libraries, the benefit of the library to the teachers and children, how the school can maintain the libraries and how they can encourage the children to sign books and read. At 10:00am, the team the children were all assembled on their assembly ground and the teacher introduced the team from Muutos which later addressed the children on their visit to their school. The team made it clear to the children that what makes people successful in life is the information they get most of it is gotten from the books they read. The team also encouraged the kids to use the books and that they should always ask their teacher questions from what they read ask for help in difficult words and meanings.

The kids were very eager at this point to see the books and to satisfy then and boast their anxiety to read the books the team told the them that they were going to share the books to them so they can see for themselves how nice the books were after which they were shred the books to later collect and the kids were very excited to see the book. After this exercise the team visited the Nursery section of the school, hand almost the same chat with the teachers and shared the books to the kids which made them so happy that they never wanted to give back the books as the images and stories in the books interest them.

On the 5th of June 2016 a team from Muutos visited CS/CNS Mbveh to talk about the importance of quality education which is goal number 4 of the SDGs to the Head teacher and how it was important that at local levels steps should be taken towards the attainment of that goal. The main reason of the teams’ visit was to encourage schools to set up libraries that will be containing a variety of books to benefit over 300 pupils for that year and expecting to benefit over 1200 pupils in 4years.

On the 10th of June 2016 the team returned back to CS/CNS Mbveh to implement the “encouraging schools to setup libraries” project.

The team arrived CS/CNS Mbveh at 9:30, were welcomed by the head teacher in his office where there had a small discussion with him about how Muutos own contribution to setting up of their libraries, the benefit of the library to the teachers and children, how the school can maintain the libraries and how they can encourage the children to sign books and read. At 10:00am, the team the children were all assembled on their assembly ground and the teacher introduced the team from Muutos which later addressed the children on their visit to their school. The team made it clear to the children that what makes people successful in life is the information they get most of it is gotten from the books they read. The team also encouraged the kids to use the books and that they should always ask their teacher questions from what they read ask for help in difficult words and meanings.

The kids were very eager at this point to see the books and to satisfy then and boast their anxiety to read the books the team told the them that they were going to share the books to them so they can see for themselves how nice the books were after which they were shred the books to later collect and the kids were very excited to see the book. After this exercise the team visited the Nursery section of the school, hand almost the same chat with the teachers and shared the books to the kids which made them so happy that they never wanted to give back the books as the images and stories in the books interest them.

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Parenting Workshop in Kwanso

Parenting Workshop in Kwanso in Organised by Muutos For Kids and CAMICS

On October 19 2017, Muutos For Kids in partnership with CAMICS micro finance organised a parenting workshop to teach parent beneficiaries of CAMICS’ loan program how to use the proceeds they get from the loans to build better families are be better parents to their kids by doing right/better investments in their children. This project had as target 50 parents which we succeeded in registering 50 parents for the program. During this workshop, the participants were taught how to properly manage the loan they take and not using the proceeds of the investment to maltreat others because they now have money more than them as many people in the locality does.

They were taught parenting styles, how no successfully improve on their parenting skills, how to support the education of their children, collaborative parenting which helps in handling challenging behaviours in children and how both parents can balance their parenting so as to grow their children well and build better families.

Pictures of the event

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Report of PS Mbve Library

On the 18th of January 2016 a team from Muutos visited PS/PNS Mbveh to talk about the importance of quality education which is goal number 4 of the SDGs to the Head teacher and how it was important that at local levels steps should be taken towards the attainment of that goal. The main reason of the teams’ visit was to encourage schools to set up libraries that will be containing a variety of books to benefit over 250 pupils for that year and expecting to benefit over 1000 pupils in 4years.

On the 24th of January 2016 the team returned back to PS/PNS Mbveh to implement the “encouraging schools to setup libraries” project.

The team arrived PS/PNS Mbveh at 9:30, were welcomed by the head teacher in his office where there had a small discussion with him about how Muutos own contribution to setting up of their libraries, the benefit of the library to the teachers and children, how the school can maintain the libraries and how they can encourage the children to sign books and read.

At 10:00am, the team the children were all assembled on their assembly ground and the teacher introduced the team from Muutos which later addressed the children on their visit to their school.

The team made it clear to the children that what makes people successful in life is the information they get most of it is gotten from the books they read. The team also encouraged the kids to use the books and that they should always ask their teacher questions from what they read ask for help in difficult words and meanings.

The kids were very eager at this point to see the books and to satisfy then and boast their anxiety to read the books the team told the them that they were going to share the books to them so they can see for themselves how nice the books were after which they were shred the books to later collect and the kids were very excited to see the book. After this exercise the team visited the Nursery section of the school, hand almost the same chat with the teachers and shared the books to the kids which made them so happy that they never wanted to give back the books as the images and stories in the books interest them.

After this exercise the team had some pictures with them and left.

Pictures of the event

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Treating children with love

Children need our love. We have discovered that children understand well when they are being thought by a teachers that show them love and same thing applies to parents. So if we can treat them with love we will be sure of having a generation of potential leaders and a good tomorrow. so this program is to go about schools and gathering of parents to encourage and teach them the importance of treating their children with love, care and respect.

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Acceptance on nonperformance basis

Acceptance on nonperformance basis is very essential for children because when they perceive that acceptance comes with performance, the whole contract changes.
Encourage your children and let them know that you love them and would not let anything come between you and them.
If your child fails an Exam and you go about shouting and showing how bad your child is, He/she will feel rejected. Look at that child as you and imagine you are the one standing on the school assembly grown waiting for your name to be called as one of the successful candidates and at the end you don’t hear your name how will you feel? And what will you expect of your parents? Love or rejection
instead of love when children fail parents get angry and reject their children.
Yes you will want to encourage, and go e your child all sort of good things but because of failure you punish and even disassociate from them.  Those are our natural inclinations but as parents you have to bulk them and apply the principle of unconditional love and bonding.
you have to sacrifice everything you love to override your emotions and disassociate your feelings about failure and consider your child separate as a person.
Always tell your children that you are proud of their perseverance and boldness in the face of defeat. You are a real champion to endure the frustration to keep trying and not giving up.
Parents/child relationship is far more important than the failure of your children.
Successful loving occurs only when people practice a policy of “Total acceptance towards one another”
Do whatever it takes to make children feel like you accept their total person.  If you deny this they will feel rejected.

Muutos for kids parenting team.
www.muutusforkids.com

 

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Higher Math in Lower Grades: Hurting or Helping Kids?

Every parent wants to see her child keep up with peers, and these days that means taking algebra in the eighth grade. But sometimes we forget that algebra is a very demanding course, full of sophisticated and abstract ideas. Do students really need to take this higher math course in lower grades, or can it do them more harm than good?

There are two sides to the issue. Politicians like the idea of offering algebra in middle school. They argue that the world has sped up over the past generation; technology has gotten more complicated, ideas more complex. Why not introduce harder concepts at younger ages? In 2008, California lawmakers began a campaign to make algebra mandatory for eighth-graders, a shift that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger compared to President John F. Kennedy’s pledge to put a man on the moon.

Meanwhile, many researchers believe that middle school students aren’t ready for algebra. In a 2008 letter to the editor of The Ventura County Star, Professor of Education Dr. Bruce Mitchell argued against California’s proposal. His letter referenced the studies of Dr. Herman Epstein, who believed that the human brain has rapid growth periods and plateau periods where no growth seems to take place. For most students, the middle school years occur during a plateau stage, and Epstein argued that “the plateau stages were not optimal times for the introduction of new higher-level thought processes, particularly algebra, which eighth-grade students fail more than any other subject. Historically, algebra has been most often offered in grades 10 though 12. That occurs during the age 14-17 growth-spurt stage, when it’s OK to teach abstract reasoning concepts.”

After listening to these two sides, parents are forced to make a choice: trust the politicians who claim that our children need to take algebra at younger ages, or the researchers who think that our children need to wait. It can be hard to figure out the right path for your child.

 

To get some answers from a hands-on expert, I spoke with award-winning high school math teacher, Jerry Brodkey. Dr. Brodkey has a PhD from Stanford in Mathematics and Curriculum Education, and has taught math for thirty-one years. He had some definite opinions about the move to teach algebra at younger and younger ages.

The “normal” track for math classes has shifted down in the past ten years.

When Dr. Brodkey began teaching, the normal track was for students to take Algebra I in ninth grade, followed by three years of college-prep math. This worked well for most students, and there was always a way for a select group of students to get ahead by taking algebra in eighth grade and advance to Calculus by their senior year. But in the past ten years, Dr. Brodkey has seen “an explosion of students taking algebra in the eighth grade. In the past five years, I’d call it a super-explosion.” The normal track in many schools now has students taking algebra in the eighth grade.

The pressure to stay on the new “normal” track pushes students into math classes for which they are not ready.

Every year, Dr. Brodkey meets with parents whose freshmen have been appropriately placed in algebra. But want to know how they can accelerate their children onto the new “normal” track so they will reach AP Calculus by their senior year. In turn, Dr. Brodkey asks the parents whether the student wants to make this jump, or if it’s a parent-driven decision. He asks them to be careful: “When a student is pushed to take a class for which he is not ready, he rarely acquires a lifelong affinity for math. Instead, he develops a desire to get out of math classes as fast as possible.” He has found that when these students get to Calculus, they can struggle. They can do the first step in the problem, but not the next nine that require solid algebra skills.

Parents push their children onto this track because they think it’s necessary for college admissions.

Parents are feeling tremendous pressure about getting their children into college. They are seeing students with a 4.3 GPA get turned away from top universities, and they are desperate to find an advantage for their child. But from Dr. Brodkey’s perspective, pushing a child onto the Calculus track doesn’t always help: “I think that college admissions officers like to see a student with a solid foundation, effective communication skills, and a record of working well with others, not someone who has struggled to fit in an extra AP class.”

The move to introduce algebra in lower grades comes from politicians, not teachers.

Like many teachers, Dr. Brodkey questions the motives for California’s campaign for eighth grade algebra: “I think that this push is part of a political agenda to show rigor in the schools. I can’t see how it’s a positive; it’s not a student-centered decision. Any student can learn algebra, but the timing is critical.” Algebra is an extremely challenging course, even more so than Calculus. Teachers introduce a brand-new topic every three or four weeks, and expect complete mastery. Thirteen and fourteen-year-old students are still developing their emotional and organizational skills, and algebra is a course that punishes any immaturity a student may have.

Algebra can be taught at lower ages, if it’s introduced slowly.

Dr. Brodkey approves of the movement to layer algebraic concepts into early education. He asks his eight-year-old daughter questions like, “What number plus eight will make twelve?” He talks to his ten-year-old son about inequalities. But he feels that the traditional way algebra is taught now, with its demanding pace, is not appropriate for all middle school students. “Eighth grade algebra is fine for some students,” he says, “and there may even be one or two students per school who benefit from the increasing hyper-acceleration of algebra into the seventh grade. But to make it an expectation for all students is not doing them any good.”

The age at which a student takes algebra must be determined on a case-by-case basis.

The age at which a student takes algebra is an important and individual decision, not one that should be made by blanket policies. Parents and teachers must work closely together to determine a student’s placement. If you’re a parent wondering whether to accelerate your student, there are some clues to look for. Algebra-ready kids are:

If you think your child is struggling in any one of these three areas, you can do him a favor by waiting another year before enrolling him in algebra. Placing your child in the right math class will teach him to feel successful and confident about his math skills. But pushing him up when he’s not yet ready can bring on a case of math anxiety that will last for a lifetime.

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Inclusive Education

A year ago, Igliassu could not even walk because one of his legs was much shorter than the other. LIGHT FOR THE WORLD helped him enrol in an inclusive school together with his peers.

Igliassu is playing with his school friends

Inclusive education is schooling for the vast majority of children within a mainstream system, where all children – including those with disabilities – are given the opportunity and support to learn together in the same classroom.

Education for everyone

Nine out of ten children with disabilities are out of school, and 80 percent of all children with disabilities live in developing countries. They are often excluded from education and society due to physical, ideological, systemic, or communication barriers.

LIGHT FOR THE WORLD strives for a school system that leaves no-one behind. We want to provide an improved quality of education for everyone. We support 20 inclusive education programmes in partner countries such as Burkina FasoEthiopiaSouth SudanNorth East India and Papua New Guinea.

Why does the world need inclusive education?

Because it is outrageous that more than 32 million children with disabilities in developing countries are out of school. That’s more than three times the entire population of Sweden!  Being out of education denies this group the ability to make friends, to learn how to read and write, and to master the skills that are crucial for future employment.

If we do not fight this injustice, we will remain light-years away from the Sustainable Development Goals target to ensure a quality education for all by 2030.

What we do

  • We help children with disabilities enrol in school
  • We assist in making school buildings and infrastructure accessible
  • We train teachers in special needs education, and provide adequate learning and teaching materials
  • We promote inclusive education on national and international levels

Isn’t inclusive education very expensive?

Contrary to what many believe, inclusive education is less costly than ‘special’ or ‘segregated’ education. In Pakistan, for instance, UNESCO found that special schools were 15 times more expensive per pupil than mainstream schools which include children with disabilities. Evidence from Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Nepal and the Philippines also suggests that the returns on investing in education for people with disabilities are two to three times higher than for those without disabilities.

How can it work on a larger scale?

Our pilot project in Garango, Burkina Faso, achieved an increase in the number of children with disabilities attending school from 4% in 2009 to more than 60% just five years later. The pilot showed that even in challenging environments with extremely limited resources, children with disabilities can take part in a quality education system which helps everyone achieve their full potential.

In 2016, we helped more than 9,000 children with disabilities to attend school in Burkina Faso and other countries.

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